Kittery committee seeks support for new library; by Jesse Scardina

3517541420_9e0178b7df_zKittery committee seeks support for new library By Jesse Scardina
jscardina@seacoastonline.com
NH_Portsmouth_Herald

KITTERY, Maine — The newly formed library committee met for the third time Wednesday morning, discussing what its role is in guiding Rice Public Library on its plans for a future location and building while also addressing a petition from residents against moving the library.

The Rice Public Library has been working for several years to find a new location to build a 21st century green library, replacing its current two-building site in the Foreside.

Library officials have been working closely with resident Barry Fitzpatrick about purchasing a plot of his land near the Kittery Community Center and building a library there, but the plan has received push back from the KCC, Town Council and neighbors for its lack of information and communication.

“Some residents in the area have brought about their concern and that’s from the position of just not knowing much about the project,” said George Dow, a Kittery resident and member of the library committee. “That leads people to have a negative thought about the project.”

The committee was tasked with helping provide answers to several questions if the library were to move adjacent to the community center, including the footprint of the new building and site, how it will be accessed, the neighborhood impact and impact on the library’s operating budget. The future of the library’s two buildings is also a task for the committee, but hasn’t been brought up as of yet.

Wednesday’s meeting was also supposed to include a presentation of the proposed site plan from library director Lee Perkins, but a scheduling misunderstanding resulted in Perkins missing the meeting.

Discussion then focused on how best to answer questions put forth by the Town Council and how to better communicate the plans and information to the public.

“The community needs to be able to buy into this,” said committee member Debra Cam. “There hasn’t been much outreach and there is some disconnect with residents.”

A petition letter from School Street resident Barbara McGaughey signed by 17 other residents on Dion Avenue and School Street opposes a library being built nearby.

“So far this project has operated in a bubble and if they want support they need to create it from the ground up,” McGaughey said in the letter.

Several committee members agreed more up-to-date information on the library’s plans should be readily available to the public.

“There needs to be some way of getting people to find out,” said Tom Emerson, a committee member.

for more of this story click this link for the Portsmouth Herald.

Retired Kittery detective Ron Avery fights brain cancer; by Jesse Scardina

From the Portsmouth Herald for the full story, click this link

Retired Kittery detective Ron Avery fights brain cancer

Retired Kittery police detective Ron Avery is surrounded at his York home by his wife, Wanda, and four sons, clockwise from left front: Jared, Ron Jr., Brandon and Ryan. Avery has an inoperable brain tumor and the family has started a GoFundMe.com page to help with travel and medical expenses.
Photo by Deb Cram/Seaoastonline
Retired Kittery police detective Ron Avery is surrounded at his York home by his wife, Wanda, and four sons, clockwise from left front: Jared, Ron Jr., Brandon and Ryan. Avery has an inoperable brain tumor and the family has started a GoFundMe.com page to help with travel and medical expenses. Photo by Deb Cram/Seaoastonline

By Jesse Scardina
jscardina@seacoastonline.com
NH_Portsmouth_YorkWeekly

YORK — Focus and determination were two traits retired Kittery police detective Ron Avery demonstrated every day for nearly 40 years on the job.

Now, with the strength of his family by his side, Avery, 62, is focused and determined while facing his toughest challenge yet: an inoperable brain tumor.

Avery, who worked as a detective in Kittery for 37 years, dealt with his share of headaches while keeping the community safe, but nothing like the ones he began experiencing about eight months ago.

“They would come on at night with great regularity,” Avery said Monday from his living room, with his wife, Wanda, and four sons by his side. “We went to the doctors and there was nothing to explain it.”

It wasn’t until the headaches began affecting his short-term memory that his sons took notice.

“Several text messages were the determination that something was wrong,” said Brandon Avery, adding that once the four sons connected with each other, they raised the concern with their mother.

On May 20, all six family members went to York Hospital and Ron Avery began testing at 11 a.m. By noon, he was in an ambulance en route to Massachusetts General Hospital with his family caravan trailing behind.

“The doctor came in saying, ‘We did what we had to do, we found what we didn’t want to find, and we can’t do anything with it here,’” Ron Avery said. “I knew from the time we left York Hospital that it was going to be a long ride. I knew the whole time it was a brain tumor.”

The diagnosis

Most of the family members were thinking on the way to Mass General that it was early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

All Ron Avery was thinking about during the ride to Boston, however, was his late brother, Gerald Avery, who died three years ago of a glioblastoma brain tumor, one of the most aggressive forms of a malignant tumor.

“Three years ago, when we found that out, all I kept thinking was, ‘Is it hereditary?’” he said, adding he was assured by doctors it was more like a lightning strike — less than 2 percent of direct family members get diagnosed with glioblastoma.

“When the doctor in Mass General told us that, our jaws dropped,” said Ryan Avery. “It was a hard pill to swallow.”

Unfortunately for the Averys, the diagnosis wasn’t immediate, as the biopsy result takes about five days. The group spent more than nine hours on that life-changing Wednesday in May, waiting for any word from any doctor when one neurosurgeon responded to the family’s angst and offered his insight.

“From noon to 9 p.m., it was like snails time,” said Jared Avery.

What the doctor described to the family, an inoperable brain tumor, was their worst fear.

“That was the first we saw of it,” Jared Avery said. “The image was clear.”

‘I’ll give this the most I can’

Avery said when his brother was diagnosed three years ago in South Carolina, he wasn’t interested in radiation treatment or chemotherapy, and wanted to live out the remainder of his life on his own terms.

With nine grandchildren between 7 months and 7 years old, Ron Avery knew that forgoing treatment was not an option.

“I’m going to give this what I have,” he said. “I’m going to give this the most I can.”

Treatment started almost immediately, with six weeks of radiation treatment at Mass General. For those six weeks, Monday through Friday, family members and close friends would take turns traveling with Avery to Mass General — stopping at Kelly’s Roast Beef in Saugus almost every trip.

“The doctors said he would be on a liquid diet,” said Wanda Avery, a retired educator who worked for decades as a teacher and principal in Kittery schools. Ron chimed in that he could never give up his steaks.

During testing, doctors found an unrelated yet problematic tumor on Avery’s esophagus, which led to more radiation sessions, half of which Avery still has to undergo.

In addition, Avery will begin chemotherapy in pill form, five days on, 23 days off, starting later this month.

‘It brought us even closer’

While outside in their back yard with their new dog, a Shi Tzu-Pomeranian mix named AllyBear, the Avery family reflected on the last couple months they’ve spent together, coming to terms and dealing with the dire news, compared to when Avery’s brother died three years ago.

“The big difference this time is the positive attitude and the fact we’re doing this and talking about this,” Brandon Avery said.

Ron Avery said when his brother made the decision to forgo treatment, he said he didn’t like playing a game he couldn’t win. Avery and his family see every day together as a victory, and aren’t bothered with counting how many victories remain.

“I’m not going to lose anything else here,” Avery said. “In the back of my mind, with her helping me, and all of these guys here, I can give it everything I have.”

Support for the Averys has come from all outlets, according to the family, including the Mass General staff and many former colleagues of both Ron and Wanda.

“Ron has a reputation of being the most ethical, moral and honest individual I have ever known,” said Ray Hazen, a detective with the Kittery Police Department. “He had a passion for the job and a true compassion for the people he served.”

The Avery family hopes sharing their patriarch’s story can help raise awareness and research to find a cure for glioblastoma and other cancers.

“Bringing the disease to light is important,” Brandon Avery said, adding his father agreed to allow his medical information to be used to help further research.

With three of the Avery’s sons and their families living in York, and the fourth in nearby Wells, family gatherings at the Averys were always a common occurrence. This summer, however, weekend gatherings of the 19 members of the Avery family have become regularly scheduled events.

“We were close before,” said Ron Avery Jr. “But it brought us even closer now.”

How to help

The Avery family has established a GoFundMe page at www.gofundme.com/averystrong for people to donate to the family’s medical and travel expenses during his treatment.

 

To follow this story, visit the Portsmouth Herald.

COPsync911 coming to Kittery schools; by Jesse Scardina

COPsync911 coming to Kittery schools

Kittery, Maine, school resource officer Jay Durgin stands in front of Traip Academy Wednesday morning. Durgin spearheaded the installation of COPsync911, a program for the school district that will allow teachers and staff to report emergencies to the Police Department immediately with a click of their laptop. Jesse Scardina photo

Kittery, Maine, school resource officer Jay Durgin stands in front of Traip Academy Wednesday morning. Durgin spearheaded the installation of COPsync911, a program for the school district that will allow teachers and staff to report emergencies to the Police Department immediately with a click of their laptop.

Jesse Scardina photo.

FROM THE PORTSMOUTH HERALD, CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL STORY

By Jesse Scardina
jscardina@seacoastonline.com
NH_Portsmouth_Herald

KITTERY, Maine — With one click on a laptop, teachers will now be able to report emergencies within their classroom to the nearest police officers on patrol.

Funded through a Traip Academy Trustees grant brought forward by school resource officer Jay Durgin, all three Kittery schools will be connected to the Kittery Police Department via COPsync911, a computer application that sends emergency notifications to officers once activated by any teacher in the school.

“It streamlines and clears up any communication about an emergency within the school,” Durgin said.

Durgin said that between shoddy cellphone reception in areas of the schools and a potential for 911 services to be routed through York or New Hampshire, resulting in valuable seconds and minutes lost, a singular emergency notification system can make all the difference during a crisis.

“This is a tool for teachers and staff and it doesn’t have to be something catastrophic,” Durgin said, adding the example of an active school shooter is the one used, but the crisis can be of a smaller magnitude. “It could be if a student is having a heart attack or seizure or if two kids are fighting and their safety is in danger.”

The grant was for $5,400, which covered the installation of the application on every staff member’s computer at the three schools, as well as the software installation on the Police Department’s end. The program will cost roughly $400 per school per year moving forward.

There is more to the story, Click here for a link to the Portsmouth Herald.

Hotel approved at Kittery outlet stores; by Jesse Scardina

HamptonlogoHotel approved at Kittery outlet stores By Jesse Scardina
jscardina@seacoastonline.com

From the Article in the Portsmouth Herald Click for the full story

KITTERY, Maine — The Planning Board approved the development of an 83-room, four-story hotel in the Kittery outlets Thursday night.

The proposal was approved 5-0, with two board members absent.

The location, which currently houses a nursing school but has been the home to several different shopping stores over the years and is known informally as the Dansk Shopping Center, will be converted into an 83-room Hampton Inn and Suites, including a pool and breakfast area for occupants. Potential future developments on the property were outlined in the plan, but wasn’t a part of the approval.

Several residents spoke in favor of the proposed development at the public hearing, which lasted roughly an hour prior to the board’s vote. George Dow, chair of the town’s Economic Development Committee, said the hotel offered the opportunity for business growth in the town and would help turn the town into a destination, rather than a pit stop through to other Seacoast towns.

“It offers the consumers in Kittery a chance to stay longer and visit other places in town,” Dow said. “It strengthens Kittery as a destination and not a passing town to York, Ogunquit or Wells.”

Anne Peters spoke against the project, stating the building isn’t in compliance with town code that calls for a sloped roof. The company, Two International Group, said sloped roofs are impractical for the hotel, as it’s difficult and dangerous to control

The property, located between Route 1 and Interstate 95, is owned by Kittery Trading Post Shops, LLC.

 

for the full and complete story visit the PORTSMOUTH HERALD AT THIS LINK

Kittery Planning board meeting tonight 8-20-2015

Hamptonlogo

 

ITEM 1 – Hampton Inn and Suites – Preliminary/Final Site Plan Review for Rte. 1

 

 

AGENDA for Thursday, August 20, 2015

6:00 P.M. to 10:00 P.M.

CALL TO ORDER – ROLL CALL – PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – APPROVAL OF MINUTES – 7/23/2015

PUBLIC COMMENTS – Public comment and opinion are welcome during this open session. However, comments and opinions related to development projects currently being reviewed by the Planning Board will be heard only during a scheduled public hearing when all interested parties have the opportunity to participate. Those providing comment must state clearly their name and address and record it in writing at the podium.

PUBLIC HEARING/OLD BUSINESS

ITEM 1 – Hampton Inn and Suites – Preliminary/Final Site Plan Review

Action: hold a public hearing, approve or deny preliminary/final site plan. Owner Kittery Trading Post Shops, LLC and applicant 275 US Route 1, LLC request consideration of a site plan for redevelopment of 4.12 acres, consisting of an 83-room hotel, located at 275 US Route 1 (Tax Map 30, Lot 41) in the Commercial – 1 (C-1) and Resource Protection Overlay (OZ-RP) Zones. Agent is Ryan Plummer, Two International Group.

OLD BUSINESS

ITEM 2 – Fernald Road Multi-Family Subdivision – Cluster Subdivision Final Plan Review

Action: approve or deny plan. Owner and applicant Peter J. Paul, Trustee of AMP Realty Holdings, LLC, requests consideration of plans to develop a multi-family residential cluster subdivision consisting of three duplexes and a triplex. The approximately 18-acre parcel is located on Tax Map 28, Lot 14 with frontage along Fernald Road in the Residential – Suburban (R-S) Zone with portions in the Commercial – 2 (C-2) and Resource Protection Overlay (OZ-RP) Zones. Agent is Tom Harmon, Civil Consultants.

NEW BUSINESS

ITEM 3 – Good To-Go, 484 US Route 1 – Shoreland Development Plan Review

Action: accept or deny plan application; approve or deny plan. Owner/applicant Cape House Management, LLC requests consideration of plans for a 1,400 square foot addition of production space and associated parking to an existing, non-conforming mixed-use structure containing a commercial kitchen. The 4.46-acre lot is located at 484 US Route 1 (Tax Map 67, Lot 9) in the Mixed Use (MU) and Shoreland Overlay (OZ-SL-250’) Zones. Agent is Ken Wood, Attar Engineering.

ITEM 4 – Rockwell Homes, 89 Route 236 – Preliminary Site Plan Completeness Review

Action: accept or deny plan application; schedule a public hearing. Owner/applicant Rockwell Homes, LLC request consideration of plans for a single, 2,520-square-foot building containing business offices and a showroom and a drive-through-only restaurant at 89 Route 236 (Tax Map 28, Lot 14-2) in the Commercial 2 (C-2) Zone. Agent is Ryan McCarthy, Tidewater Engineering & Surveying, LLC.

ITEM 5– Kolad Seawall Replacement–Shoreland Development Plan Review

Action: accept or deny plan application; approve or deny plan. Owner/applicant Jeffrey and Deborah Kolad requests consideration of plans for replacement of an existing seawall and the expansion of a waterfront shed. The 0.45-acre lot is located at 92 Whipple Road (Tax Map 10, Lot 19) in the Residential-Urban (R-U) and Shoreland Overlay (OZ-SL-250’) Zones. Agent is Barney Baker, Baker Design Consultants.

ITEM 6– Kittery Point Yacht Yard Renovations –Shoreland Development Plan Review

Action: accept or deny plan application; approve or deny plan. Owner and applicant MGX, LLC a.k.a Kittery Point Yacht Yard, Corp. requests consideration of plans for replacement of an existing marine railway with an at-grade boat ramp requiring fill within the intertidal zone. The 1.3-acre lot is located at 48 Bowen Road (Tax Map 17, Lot 10) in the Residential-Urban (R-U) and Shoreland Overlay (OZ-SL) and Commercial Fisheries/Maritime Activities (OZ-CMFU) Overlay Zones. Agent is Barney Baker, Baker Design Consultants.

ITEM 7– Board Member Items / Discussion A. Committee Updates B. Other

Town Council Agenda and Council Packets for August 10th, 2015

PAPERWORK

http://www.kitteryme.gov/Pages/KitteryME_News/051FB996-000F8513

August 10, 2015 Council Chambers

Kittery Town Council

Regular Meeting

7:00 p.m.

1. Call to Order

2. Introductory

3. Pledge of Allegiance

4. Roll Call

5. Agenda Amendment and Adoption

6. Town Manager’s Report

7. Acceptance of Previous Minutes – 7/13/15 and 7/27/15 Regular Meetings

8. Interviews for the Board of Appeals and Planning

9. All items involving the town attorney, town engineers, town employees or other town consultants or requested officials –

10. PUBLIC HEARINGS

11. DISCUSSION

a. Discussion by members of the public (three minutes per person)

b. Response to public comment directed to a particular Councilor

c. Chairperson’s response to public comments

12. UNFINISHED BUSINESS

(070215-1) The Kittery Town Council moves to approve and sign the Wood Island Life Saving Station Preservation Agreement.

13. NEW BUSINESS

a. Donations/gifts received for Council disposition

b. (080115-1) The Kittery Town Council moves to receive a York River presentation and moves to adopt the recommended slate of members for the York River Wild and Scenic Study Committee.

c. (080115-2) The Kittery Town Council moves to authorize Tributary Brewing Co., LLC, 5 Winding Brooke Lane, South Berwick, ME, a one day extension for Tributary Brewing Company, 10 Shapleigh Road, Site A, to hold a one day event on September 5, 2015 from noon to 9:00 p.m. to serve beer under an enclosed tent in front of the establishment.

d. (080115-3) The Kittery Town Council moves to authorize the request from Kittery Parent-Teacher Association to hold the Seaside 4 Miler Race at Fort Foster on September 20, 2015, and to place a banner across Rogers Road, in front of the Community Center, from September 1st to 22nd, 2015, advertising the September 20th Seaside 4-miler race at Fort Foster.

e. (080115-4) The Kittery Town Council moves to approve an “Alcohol Permit for BikeME event,” on September 12, 2015 at Fort Foster.

f. (080115-5) The Kittery Town Council moves to approve the disbursement warrants.

g. (080115-6) The Kittery Town Council moves to schedule a date for a public hearing for the Kittery Land Trust bond referendum.

h. (080115-7) The Kittery Town Council moves to schedule a date for a public hearing to transfer appropriations between accounts and carry forward requests.

i. (080115-8) The Kittery Town Council moves to appoint a representative to meet with the Rice Public Library Board of Trustees to interview George Dow for appoint to that board.

14. COUNCILOR ISSUES OR COMMENT

15. COMMITTEE AND OTHER REPORTS

a. Communications from the Chairperson

b. Committee Reports

16. EXECUTIVE SESSION

17. ADJOURNMENT

 

Kittery Nomination Papers Available August 12th, 2015

652405-nominationpaperscrutiny-1388347452-422-640x480

Nomination papers will be available beginning Wednesday, August 12, 2015, at the Town Clerk’s office, 200 Rogers Road, for Town Council and School Committee. The Municipal Election to elect three nominees to the Town Council and two nominees to the School Committee for three-year terms will be held on November 3, 2015, at the Kittery Community Center Gymnasium, 120 Rogers Road. Nomination papers may be obtained Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Town Clerk’s Office and must be returned to the Town Clerk by 6:00 p.m., on Monday, September 21, 2015.

Retired Kittery Detective Sergeant Ronald Avery needs OUR help now!

Kittery Police Retired Detective Sergent Roand Avery

Ronald Avery of York, ME during his retirement party after 39 years.

$4,255 of $50k

Raised by 67 people in 2 days

Donate Now

 by; Ryan Avery. Ron and Wanda Avery’s son
to donate, visit the following link and please share on facebook.

http://www.gofundme.com/averystrong

Created August 7, 2015
Ronald Avery

Kittery Post Office Square’s Farmers Market

To read the rest of this story, click this link to the Portsmouth Herald.

 

By Karen Dandurant
news@seacoastonline.com

August 03. 2015 2:01AM

Buy local at your town’s farmers market

KITTERY, Maine – One of the best parts of summer on the Seacoast are the many local farmers markets, offering fresh, locally grown produce, flowers, and so much more.

Farmers markets offer patrons a chance to buy local, to support the economy while enjoying the bountiful fruits, vegetables and other things produced by friends and neighbors. As far as taste and freshness goes, most patrons of farmers market will agree there is absolutely no comparison to buying from bigger stores.

Kittery, Maine, resident Lisa Etzel was at the Kittery market on Sunday. However, she said she is a huge fan and often goes to the Portsmouth market or the one in York. She came with her dog Rhylee and her “almost daughter-in-law” Jennifer Agriesti, visiting from North Carolina.

“I love that these are here,” Etzel said. “I can support my communities by buying local. There is usually music and the people are so friendly. It’s a great way to shop for the freshest ingredients.”

Frank Harrison of White Thistle Farm in Candia said people coming to farmers markets not only support the local economy, but they also know exactly where their food is coming from.

“We need to know where we get our food,” Harrison said. “In those big box stores, you don’t even know what country the food comes from. I am a beekeeper and have a sugar shack. I raise all my own meats that I use and sell.”

To read the rest of this story, Click this link to the Portsmouth Herald

Town looking for comprehensive plan consultant

PlanningProcessTo read the rest of this story at the Portsmouth Herald, click this link.

By Jesse Scardina
jscardina@seacoastonline.com

August 02. 2015 2:01AM

Town looking for comprehensive plan consultant

KITTERY, Maine – Recently, a group of residents proposed a demolition moratorium in the Foreside, a budding area of town that has seen tremendous growth and attracted the attention of developers and tourists.

The restaurants, boutiques and other destinations came together over the past half-decade rather organically, with business owners finding a harmony in the different stores.

This organic growth has those living in the Foreside and those in town that enjoy frequenting the area wondering what the future holds – and if the town is set up to control growth and development, not only in the Foreside, but throughout town.

To help forecast the future, town administrators recently advertised a request for proposal for a comprehensive plan consultant to help draft a 10-year plan for the

 

To read the rest of this story at the Portsmouth Herald, click this link.